Reports

Report | Florida PIRG Education Fund | Financial Reform

Following the Money 2014

This report, Florida PIRG Education Fund’s fifth annual evaluation of state transparency websites, finds that states are making progress toward comprehensive, one-stop, one-click transparency and accountability for state government spending. Over the past year, new states have opened the books on public spending and several states have adopted new practices to further expand citizens’ access to critical spending information. Many states, however, still have a long way to go to provide taxpayers with the information they need to ensure that government is spending their money effectively.

Report | Florida PIRG Education Fund | Consumer Protection

Debt Collectors, Debt Complaints

This is the fifth in a series of reports that review complaints to the CFPB nationally and on a state-by-state level. In this report we explore consumer complaints about debt collection, with the aim of uncovering patterns in the problems consumers are experiencing with debt collectors and documenting the role of the CFPB in helping consumers successfully resolve their complaints.

Report | Florida PIRG Education Fund | Transportation

A New Course

Universities and colleges across the country are taking steps to encourage their communities, students, faculty and staff to decrease their reliance on personal vehicles. These efforts are working well – saving money for universities, improving the quality of life in college towns, and giving today’s students experience in living life without depending on a personal car.

Report | Florida PIRG | Tax

Closing the Billion Dollar Loophole

Our new report tells how some states have found a simple reform to reclaim significant revenue lost to offshore tax havens. It includes estimates of how much Florida loses in state revenue to offshore tax haven abuse and how much it would gain by closing the "water's edge" loophole.

Report | Florida PIRG Education Fund | Higher Ed

Fixing the Broken Textbook Market

The cost of college textbooks has skyrocketed in recent years. To students and families already struggling to afford high tuition and fees, an additional $1,200 per year on books and supplies can be the breaking point. As publishers keep costs high by pumping out new editions and selling books bundled with software, students are forced to forgo book purchases or otherwiseundermine their academic progress. In recent years, some steps have been taken to provide relief from runaway costs. The Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008 requires publishers to disclose textbook prices to professors during the marketing process, and for students to see textbook prices during course registration! Short-term cost-reducing options: Recently, publishers have increased cost-saving options like e-textbooks. Rental programs and used book markets have also emerged as more consumer-friendly options to new books. According to the National Association of College. Stores, more than 3,000 schools offer rental programs, up from 300 in 2009. Unfortunately, since the price of rental, used, and e- books is dictated by the price of the new print edition, these models can only take us so far.

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